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December 31 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

We're only a few hours away from the end of the year, so for brevity's sake, I will not write an all-encompassing retro- or introspective of this year and myself. Rather, I'll post mostly pictures with captions.

Going away

The time we spent away from Vienna.

Prague

We went to Prague, a first for both of us. We found a cozy little AirBnB very near to the old town and spent three days eating us through various restaurants.

A list of noteworthy things in 2017
A collection of dumplings and meats served in a small restaurant near the Prague Castle. An area, by the way, you can with no regrets choose to ignore. There's so many other places to see, there is no reason at all to wait in line for hours.

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017
The view from one of the many bridges in Prague. There's so many tourists around, try not to cross the

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

Also, loads of museums. The national museums are spectacular and apart from a very affordable 15€ to access all of them, they were more or less deserted. See the below picture of the museum of modern art as a symbolic representation of said deserted state.
A list of noteworthy things in 2017

It's unfathomable to me how so few people would visit these places, but my best guess is, that Prague is just so full of great things, it's hard to go everywhere.

Anyway, that was Prague. The train from Vienna to Prague, by the way, had a happy hour when we went, which made for the cheapest, best beer I've ever had on a train. I later found out that happy hour is all the time on those trains.

Corfu

Our first time on Corfu but most probably not our last. We spent a week in a small village with might as well have been created for tourists alone. At least it looked that way. It wasn't to our detriment, because it meant that on a stretch of roughly 800 meters, we'd find about 30 restaurants nestled against a sandy beach.

We ate, swam and drank. I also read YOU WILL KNOW ME by Megan Abott there, and was turned into an instant fan.

Have some pictures.

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

Munich

We also spent a few days in Munich for my birthday. It was a bit of an impromptu vacation, but turned out to be quite fantastic. I won't bother you with the details here, because I've already written two accounts of what we did there. You can find them here and here.

Scotland

Well, what can I say? Scotland is the best and we spent two weeks driving through the highlands and the Western isles. I'm still planning on writing a few more words about it, but whenever I try to, I realize that words and even pictures won't do the whole thing justice. Still, here's some pictures.

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

Podcasts

Podcasts have seen quite a surge in popularity in 2017. Which is fine by me, considering we're still going strong with Zeitsprung, a history podcast in German about, well, stories from history. We managed to keep up our schedule of posting an episode a week. You should check it out, if you speak German.

Also, there is this funny saying that once you start podcasting, you'll sooner or later not be content with making just one. Not sure if that's actually a saying, but it happened that way with me. So in 2017, I also created my very own podcast for my other project, the selfhostedweb.org.

It's about software you can install on your own server in order to not be dependent on hosted services as much. The release cycle is somewhat slower than Zeitsprung, but I did manage to release four episodes (the latest of which just yesterday). It's in English, in order to be able to reach more than just the German-speaking world. You can find it here or wherever you usually get your podcasts from.

What else?

When in Corfu, I read YOU WILL KNOW ME, by Megan Abbott. It turned out to be fantastic. At the end of the year, I read DARE ME, which was equally fantastic. You should buy her books.

And that's it. The shooting outside the window is showing me that time is running out. I'll have to go ahead and start preparing the New Year's Eve dinner.

Have a good 2018, whoever you are who's reading this.

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

We're only a few hours away from the end of the year, so for brevity's sake, I will not write an all-encompassing retro- or introspective of this year and myself. Rather, I'll post mostly pictures with captions.

Going away

The time we spent away from Vienna.

Prague

We went to Prague, a first for both of us. We found a cozy little AirBnB very near to the old town and spent three days eating us through various restaurants.

A list of noteworthy things in 2017
A collection of dumplings and meats served in a small restaurant near the Prague Castle. An area, by the way, you can with no regrets choose to ignore. There's so many other places to see, there is no reason at all to wait in line for hours.

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017
The view from one of the many bridges in Prague. There's so many tourists around, try not to cross the

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

Also, loads of museums. The national museums are spectacular and apart from a very affordable 15€ to access all of them, they were more or less deserted. See the below picture of the museum of modern art as a symbolic representation of said deserted state.
A list of noteworthy things in 2017

It's unfathomable to me how so few people would visit these places, but my best guess is, that Prague is just so full of great things, it's hard to go everywhere.

Anyway, that was Prague. The train from Vienna to Prague, by the way, had a happy hour when we went, which made for the cheapest, best beer I've ever had on a train. I later found out that happy hour is all the time on those trains.

Corfu

Our first time on Corfu but most probably not our last. We spent a week in a small village with might as well have been created for tourists alone. At least it looked that way. It wasn't to our detriment, because it meant that on a stretch of roughly 800 meters, we'd find about 30 restaurants nestled against a sandy beach.

We ate, swam and drank. I also read YOU WILL KNOW ME by Megan Abott there, and was turned into an instant fan.

Have some pictures.

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

Munich

We also spent a few days in Munich for my birthday. It was a bit of an impromptu vacation, but turned out to be quite fantastic. I won't bother you with the details here, because I've already written two accounts of what we did there. You can find them here and here.

Scotland

Well, what can I say? Scotland is the best and we spent two weeks driving through the highlands and the Western isles. I'm still planning on writing a few more words about it, but whenever I try to, I realize that words and even pictures won't do the whole thing justice. Still, here's some pictures.

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

A list of noteworthy things in 2017

Podcasts

Podcasts have seen quite a surge in popularity in 2017. Which is fine by me, considering we're still going strong with Zeitsprung, a history podcast in German about, well, stories from history. We managed to keep up our schedule of posting an episode a week. You should check it out, if you speak German.

Also, there is this funny saying that once you start podcasting, you'll sooner or later not be content with making just one. Not sure if that's actually a saying, but it happened that way with me. So in 2017, I also created my very own podcast for my other project, the selfhostedweb.org.

It's about software you can install on your own server in order to not be dependent on hosted services as much. The release cycle is somewhat slower than Zeitsprung, but I did manage to release four episodes (the latest of which just yesterday). It's in English, in order to be able to reach more than just the German-speaking world. You can find it here or wherever you usually get your podcasts from.

What else?

When in Corfu, I read YOU WILL KNOW ME, by Megan Abbott. It turned out to be fantastic. At the end of the year, I read DARE ME, which was equally fantastic. You should buy her books.

And that's it. The shooting outside the window is showing me that time is running out. I'll have to go ahead and start preparing the New Year's Eve dinner.

Have a good 2018, whoever you are who's reading this.

November 16 2017

Twitter and 280 characters

Twitter and 280 characters

A few days ago Twitter upped the number of characters per tweet from 140 to 280 characters. It's an interesting development that sparked ire from many and praise from nobody (the silent majority just get on with their lives).

I wanted to leave a few thoughts about this here. Because, as you might have noticed, I've become quite critical of the way Twitter has turned what once was a thriving ecosphere of bloggers in return for a thriving company - at least when it comes to users, not so much when it comes to actual profits.

I think that the lowering of the character limit is a step in a direction which is quite directly linked to the fact that in the end, people do like to read and write more than just those few characters. Just take a look at this trend that emerged during the last few years: the "thread". Instead of trying to convey whatever they need to in 140 characters, people instead create twitter threads, and naturally, you can write as many tweets as you want to make up that thread. It's a direct result of people wanting the immediacy and interconnectedness of Twitter, while still writing blogpost-length pieces. Creating threads of snippets that then make up one big piece is one solution - a bloggerization of Twitter in a way. It's also a clumsy and cumbersome way to both write and read.

Upping the character limit to 280 characters is then not that stupid of a thing to do. People will write longer pieces anyway, only now those threads don't have to comprise twenty tweets, but ten. It's still clumsy though and I think we're moving towards a total nixing of the character limit. It's what Facebook did and it's something Twitter should have done from the start. By now, barely anyone but those who consider themselves the guardians of something like classic Twitter really cares about the character limit. What Twitter lives off of is the fact that it's now a social network with a focus on the written word, and that's its strength. Why create artificial limitations? Because some people bemoan the fact that they're not forced to keep their texts brief? That's akin to smokers who bemoan lax smoking laws that keep them from quitting smoking. It's a way to look at things, but it's a stupid one.

And if we're honest, by now a person's Twitter page is basically what a blog consists of, by definition:

  • tags
  • links
  • pictures
  • videos
  • comments

The only thing missing is a title to tweets and generally, finding a title to a blogpost, especially if you blog often, is usually the hardest part about the whole damn thing - just look at my rather uninspired title.

Now, do I think that development is a good thing? Well, I do and I don't. If it were up to me, we'd all use our own blogs, but have them linked in one way or another to facilitate discussion and interaction. The thing is, we were almost there back in around 2000 to 2005. With tools like Technorati, a good feed reader and a bit of commenting discipline, the network of blogs felt both connected and individual. It was the heyday of personal blogs, but I'm under no illusion that we'll ever be able to find our way back there. With companies like Twitter and Facebook and their stranglehold on networking and the ensuing communication, getting people to pack up their stuff and spend even a few hours a month on maintaining their individual place on the web is a thing of the past.

Still, I think people should take a good, hard look at the way they're using Twitter (and Facebook for that matter) and decide whether it wouldn't be worth a shot to move to a platform that affords them full creative freedom, both when it comes to format and content, instead of trying to cram their thoughts into the idiosyncracies of a service that wasn't ever meant to be used that way.

Twitter and 280 characters

Twitter and 280 characters

A few days ago Twitter upped the number of characters per tweet from 140 to 280 characters. It's an interesting development that sparked ire from many and praise from nobody (the silent majority just get on with their lives).

I wanted to leave a few thoughts about this here. Because, as you might have noticed, I've become quite critical of the way Twitter has turned what once was a thriving ecosphere of bloggers in return for a thriving company - at least when it comes to users, not so much when it comes to actual profits.

I think that the lowering of the character limit is a step in a direction which is quite directly linked to the fact that in the end, people do like to read and write more than just those few characters. Just take a look at this trend that emerged during the last few years: the "thread". Instead of trying to convey whatever they need to in 140 characters, people instead create twitter threads, and naturally, you can write as many tweets as you want to make up that thread. It's a direct result of people wanting the immediacy and interconnectedness of Twitter, while still writing blogpost-length pieces. Creating threads of snippets that then make up one big piece is one solution - a bloggerization of Twitter in a way. It's also a clumsy and cumbersome way to both write and read.

Upping the character limit to 280 characters is then not that stupid of a thing to do. People will write longer pieces anyway, only now those threads don't have to comprise twenty tweets, but ten. It's still clumsy though and I think we're moving towards a total nixing of the character limit. It's what Facebook did and it's something Twitter should have done from the start. By now, barely anyone but those who consider themselves the guardians of something like classic Twitter really cares about the character limit. What Twitter lives off of is the fact that it's now a social network with a focus on the written word, and that's its strength. Why create artificial limitations? Because some people bemoan the fact that they're not forced to keep their texts brief? That's akin to smokers who bemoan lax smoking laws that keep them from quitting smoking. It's a way to look at things, but it's a stupid one.

And if we're honest, by now a person's Twitter page is basically what a blog consists of, by definition:

  • tags
  • links
  • pictures
  • videos
  • comments

The only thing missing is a title to tweets and generally, finding a title to a blogpost, especially if you blog often, is usually the hardest part about the whole damn thing - just look at my rather uninspired title.

Now, do I think that development is a good thing? Well, I do and I don't. If it were up to me, we'd all use our own blogs, but have them linked in one way or another to facilitate discussion and interaction. The thing is, we were almost there back in around 2000 to 2005. With tools like Technorati, a good feed reader and a bit of commenting discipline, the network of blogs felt both connected and individual. It was the heyday of personal blogs, but I'm under no illusion that we'll ever be able to find our way back there. With companies like Twitter and Facebook and their stranglehold on networking and the ensuing communication, getting people to pack up their stuff and spend even a few hours a month on maintaining their individual place on the web is a thing of the past.

Still, I think people should take a good, hard look at the way they're using Twitter (and Facebook for that matter) and decide whether it wouldn't be worth a shot to move to a platform that affords them full creative freedom, both when it comes to format and content, instead of trying to cram their thoughts into the idiosyncracies of a service that wasn't ever meant to be used that way.

September 29 2017

A few days in Munich, Part II

A few days in Munich, Part II

This is a meticulous retelling of the second day spent in Munich about a month ago. If you are a slave of chronology, do look at part 1 first.

As described in detail in that first part, we spent our first day mostly drinking and eating. If you thought day two would be the same, you're sorely mistaken. Well, somewhat mistaken.

Being the culture vultures we are, we spent most of the next day in museums. The first one we visited was the Treasury inside the Munich Residenz, the former palaces of the Bavarian monarchs.

It holds things of great value and sometimes even more fun: like this thing here:

A few days in Munich, Part II

The weather was quite spectacular, made even better by ambling along equally spectacular buildings and monuments:

A few days in Munich, Part II

A few days in Munich, Part II
The Pinakothek der Moderne, which, as the name suggests, has modern art on display.

A few days in Munich, Part II
The Neue Pinakothek, the museum that holds mostly 19th and earlier 20th century art. More about that a bit later.

A few days in Munich, Part II
And finally a monument of Maximilian of Bavaria, one of the rulers who did what rulers do until they die to be eventually erected as statues throughout the lands.

After this stint in a museum, it was already time to replenish our depleted energy levels, a habit commonly referred to as eating. And Munich being Munich, there's a whole bunch of great food to be had. We decided on Restaurant Maxvorstadt, a quaint little restaurant that serves things that make me happy.
A few days in Munich, Part II
Like these pieces of juicy pork with extra crackling and dumplings.

Invigorated, we went back to the Pinakothek der Moderne, which, apart from housing a generous collection is also an impressive building by itself:

A few days in Munich, Part II
This here is the front, the one above is from the side and the one right at the top of this post is from right inside this main entrance hall. It has all the right amounts of brutalism to keep me entertained.

But, looking at art, regardless of its worth to me and mankind, is a tasking endeavour, so right after the Neue Pinakothek we didn't have a choice but to make our way to the English Garden, Munich's most famous park, in order to yet again taste their beer in oversized containers right under the Chinese Tower.

A few days in Munich, Part II
This is not the Chines tower. I did not take a picture of the Chinese Tower.

A few days in Munich, Part II
This is a picture of an oversized container of beer, though.

As it was my birthday, I decreed that the rest of the day would be spent eating and drinking. Which we did.

We went and had a meal at a place that had a very typically Bavarian name, which I forgot. The food, again, was right down my alley, though.

A few days in Munich, Part II

We ended this day by having a nightcap at a French themed place near where we lived, yet another name I forgot, which in turn reminds me that I should probably write things down more often.

A few days in Munich, Part II

Do come back for part 3 of this riveting tale. For it will show you what we did on on the third and final day (if you're guessing museums and food, you might be on to something).

A few days in Munich, Part II

A few days in Munich, Part II

This is a meticulous retelling of the second day spent in Munich about a month ago. If you are a slave of chronology, do look at part 1 first.

As described in detail in that first part, we spent our first day mostly drinking and eating. If you thought day two would be the same, you're sorely mistaken. Well, somewhat mistaken.

Being the culture vultures we are, we spent most of the next day in museums. The first one we visited was the Treasury inside the Munich Residenz, the former palaces of the Bavarian monarchs.

It holds things of great value and sometimes even more fun: like this thing here:

A few days in Munich, Part II

The weather was quite spectacular, made even better by ambling along equally spectacular buildings and monuments:

A few days in Munich, Part II

A few days in Munich, Part II
The Pinakothek der Moderne, which, as the name suggests, has modern art on display.

A few days in Munich, Part II
The Neue Pinakothek, the museum that holds mostly 19th and earlier 20th century art. More about that a bit later.

A few days in Munich, Part II
And finally a monument of Maximilian of Bavaria, one of the rulers who did what rulers do until they die to be eventually erected as statues throughout the lands.

After this stint in a museum, it was already time to replenish our depleted energy levels, a habit commonly referred to as eating. And Munich being Munich, there's a whole bunch of great food to be had. We decided on Restaurant Maxvorstadt, a quaint little restaurant that serves things that make me happy.
A few days in Munich, Part II
Like these pieces of juicy pork with extra crackling and dumplings.

Invigorated, we went back to the Pinakothek der Moderne, which, apart from housing a generous collection is also an impressive building by itself:

A few days in Munich, Part II
This here is the front, the one above is from the side and the one right at the top of this post is from right inside this main entrance hall. It has all the right amounts of brutalism to keep me entertained.

But, looking at art, regardless of its worth to me and mankind, is a tasking endeavour, so right after the Neue Pinakothek we didn't have a choice but to make our way to the English Garden, Munich's most famous park, in order to yet again taste their beer in oversized containers right under the Chinese Tower.

A few days in Munich, Part II
This is not the Chines tower. I did not take a picture of the Chinese Tower.

A few days in Munich, Part II
This is a picture of an oversized container of beer, though.

As it was my birthday, I decreed that the rest of the day would be spent eating and drinking. Which we did.

We went and had a meal at a place that had a very typically Bavarian name, which I forgot. The food, again, was right down my alley, though.

A few days in Munich, Part II

We ended this day by having a nightcap at a French themed place near where we lived, yet another name I forgot, which in turn reminds me that I should probably write things down more often.

A few days in Munich, Part II

Do come back for part 3 of this riveting tale. For it will show you what we did on on the third and final day (if you're guessing museums and food, you might be on to something).

August 16 2017

A few days in Munich, Part I

A few days in Munich, Part I

or how spending time visiting museums and drinking beer is time well spent.

You know what, I've just decided that this will be a multi-part series about our visit to Munich a few days ago. Since I've grown accustomed to writing smaller snippets as opposed to vast virtual tomes of information, you'll find a few pictures in every instalment and you'll most probably like it.

Day one: Weißwurschtfrühstück, or for those unfamiliar with this composite: boiled sausage with herbs, for breakfast. Traditionally accompanied by beer, or to be more precise, Weißbier.

A few days in Munich, Part I

You'll notice a pretzel in the background, a baked good that's wildly popular across the world and while everyone claims they invented it, nobody really knows who actually did it. The Bavarians perfected it, though, that's for sure.

We didn't manage any museums on day one, because right afterwards we had another beer, this time in huge one-liter mugs, at the venerable Hofbräuhaus.

A few days in Munich, Part I

As is tradition, and tradition, you should never forget, is of utmost importance in Bavaria, you have a dark beer at the Hofbräuhaus. It's a good beer, so I'm all for this tradition.

Afterwards we had some more beer and some more food, etc.

A few days in Munich, Part I

A few days in Munich, Part I

or how spending time visiting museums and drinking beer is time well spent.

You know what, I've just decided that this will be a multi-part series about our visit to Munich a few days ago. Since I've grown accustomed to writing smaller snippets as opposed to vast virtual tomes of information, you'll find a few pictures in every instalment and you'll most probably like it.

Day one: Weißwurschtfrühstück, or for those unfamiliar with this composite: boiled sausage with herbs, for breakfast. Traditionally accompanied by beer, or to be more precise, Weißbier.

A few days in Munich, Part I

You'll notice a pretzel in the background, a baked good that's wildly popular across the world and while everyone claims they invented it, nobody really knows who actually did it. The Bavarians perfected it, though, that's for sure.

We didn't manage any museums on day one, because right afterwards we had another beer, this time in huge one-liter mugs, at the venerable Hofbräuhaus.

A few days in Munich, Part I

As is tradition, and tradition, you should never forget, is of utmost importance in Bavaria, you have a dark beer at the Hofbräuhaus. It's a good beer, so I'm all for this tradition.

Afterwards we had some more beer and some more food, etc.

May 11 2017

The Martini Chronicles Pt.15: The Graham Greene

The Martini Chronicles Pt.15: The Graham Greene

Ever since cleaning up some of my posts on here, I've been thinking about my Martini Chronicles and whether I should add yet another update.

For those who aren't familiar with what they are: I used to not know the littlest thing about Martinis, until one day I decided to master the art of making the best of Martinis.

It took me a while, but after a few months, lots of vermouth and vastly more gin, I knew how to make Martinis and some of its best variants. Since then, I stopped updating the chronicles (even though I never stopped drinking the Martinis).

A few months ago, though, I learned of a new variation, named after the bard who penned much loved spy-novels: Graham Greene.

According to lore, he invented the cocktail while staying in Vietnam, on assignment as a correspondent for French periodical Paris Match. Apparently, much time was spent at the hotel bar. In its essence, it's a classic Dry Martini. Lots of gin, some Vermouth. To turn it into a Graham Greene, all you have to do is add a splash of Crème de Cassis.

The first time I tried my hand at a Graham Greene, it turned out I had no clear grasp on what constitutes a splash. It was a lesson I had to learn by drinking a very sweet Dry Martini (it wasn't the worst). I finally found the sweet spot, though, and what you see here is a, dare I say, rather good Graham Greene.
The Martini Chronicles Pt.15: The Graham Greene

Try it yourself, but drink responsibly, 'cause nobody likes a surly drunk.

The Martini Chronicles Pt.15: The Graham Greene

The Martini Chronicles Pt.15: The Graham Greene

Ever since cleaning up some of my posts on here, I've been thinking about my Martini Chronicles and whether I should add yet another update.

For those who aren't familiar with what they are: I used to not know the littlest thing about Martinis, until one day I decided to master the art of making the best of Martinis.

It took me a while, but after a few months, lots of vermouth and vastly more gin, I knew how to make Martinis and some of its best variants. Since then, I stopped updating the chronicles (even though I never stopped drinking the Martinis).

A few months ago, though, I learned of a new variation, named after the bard who penned much loved spy-novels: Graham Greene.

According to lore, he invented the cocktail while staying in Vietnam, on assignment as a correspondent for French periodical Paris Match. Apparently, much time was spent at the hotel bar. In its essence, it's a classic Dry Martini. Lots of gin, some Vermouth. To turn it into a Graham Greene, all you have to do is add a splash of Crème de Cassis.

The first time I tried my hand at a Graham Greene, it turned out I had no clear grasp on what constitutes a splash. It was a lesson I had to learn by drinking a very sweet Dry Martini (it wasn't the worst). I finally found the sweet spot, though, and what you see here is a, dare I say, rather good Graham Greene.
The Martini Chronicles Pt.15: The Graham Greene

Try it yourself, but drink responsibly, 'cause nobody likes a surly drunk.

The Martini Chronicles Pt.15: The Graham Greene
The Martini Chronicles Pt.15: The Graham Greene

April 28 2017

Spring cleaning

Spring cleaning

We're deep into spring, which was a great excuse to go ahead and do some spring cleaning on here and with all the other stuff I tend to self-host lately.

To set the scene, here's my conundrum: I like Ghost in principle, but some things about it turn me off it quite a bit. One of those? Updates! When you're spoiled by how smooth updates work with Wordpress by now, having to go into the console to update, then praying it didn't fuck up your nginx install or whatever else could have gone wrong is a bit of a pain.

Which is when I decided to give Cloudron a go. I'd heard about it before but was hesitant to actually try it out. Here's what it does: if you want to enjoy the benefits of self-hosting, namely being the owner of your own content, etc., but don't want the hassle of installations, updates, SSL certificates and everything else that comes with self-hosting, Cloudron does all that for you. All you need is a server (for example at Digital Ocean, where I have mine), a domain-name and you're good to go. Cloudron offers a hosted version of their service as well, so if you want to be able to install whatever open-source apps you want and don't even care about the hassle of getting your own server, this is the solution for you. For everyone who does self-host Cloudron, the service is free (and support is splendid).

So, I've moved my Ghost-install from totally self-hosting to hosting by Cloudron and I couldn't be happier. Exporting my posts from Ghost and then importing them into my new installation worked well (after upping the memory allocated to the Ghost app a bit), and the good people at the Cloudron chat gave me ample information on how to work with their command line tool to add the images that Ghost doesn't actually serve with the export.

I've also switched my Wallabag, Nextcloud and FreshRSS install over to Cloudron.

Also, since I now feel a bit more comfortable investing time into cleaning up this mess here (which just tends to happen when you export, import, export again and the import again around a thousand posts), I've started to clean up a lot of the posts. Dead links, dead images, and also Flickr embeds which are now either hosted here or via my new self-hosted Gallery app Koken (which in itself is a fantastic piece of software).

You can now, for example, enjoy my Martini Chronicles again.

Anyway, there's about 800 posts left that still need my attention, so I better get to it.

Spring cleaning

Spring cleaning

We're deep into spring, which was a great excuse to go ahead and do some spring cleaning on here and with all the other stuff I tend to self-host lately.

To set the scene, here's my conundrum: I like Ghost in principle, but some things about it turn me off it quite a bit. One of those? Updates! When you're spoiled by how smooth updates work with Wordpress by now, having to go into the console to update, then praying it didn't fuck up your nginx install or whatever else could have gone wrong is a bit of a pain.

Which is when I decided to give Cloudron a go. I'd heard about it before but was hesitant to actually try it out. Here's what it does: if you want to enjoy the benefits of self-hosting, namely being the owner of your own content, etc., but don't want the hassle of installations, updates, SSL certificates and everything else that comes with self-hosting, Cloudron does all that for you. All you need is a server (for example at Digital Ocean, where I have mine), a domain-name and you're good to go. Cloudron offers a hosted version of their service as well, so if you want to be able to install whatever open-source apps you want and don't even care about the hassle of getting your own server, this is the solution for you. For everyone who does self-host Cloudron, the service is free (and support is splendid).

So, I've moved my Ghost-install from totally self-hosting to hosting by Cloudron and I couldn't be happier. Exporting my posts from Ghost and then importing them into my new installation worked well (after upping the memory allocated to the Ghost app a bit), and the good people at the Cloudron chat gave me ample information on how to work with their command line tool to add the images that Ghost doesn't actually serve with the export.

I've also switched my Wallabag, Nextcloud and FreshRSS install over to Cloudron.

Also, since I now feel a bit more comfortable investing time into cleaning up this mess here (which just tends to happen when you export, import, export again and the import again around a thousand posts), I've started to clean up a lot of the posts. Dead links, dead images, and also Flickr embeds which are now either hosted here or via my new self-hosted Gallery app Koken (which in itself is a fantastic piece of software).

You can now, for example, enjoy my Martini Chronicles again.

Anyway, there's about 800 posts left that still need my attention, so I better get to it.

Spring cleaning
Spring cleaning

January 16 2017

Aurora's "Nature Boy"

Aurora's

For some reason I missed the trailer to the new Alien: Covenant picture. It looks alright by me, but what I really liked about it was a subdued cover version of Nat King Cole's "Nature Boy".

Turns out it's by Norwegian singer Aurora, and according to the official video on YouTube I've missed that song too, by about a year and more than a million views.

It's a great rendition, and you should listen to it.

Speaking of "great", the whole story of how the actual song came to be is quite interesting as well. It involves a somewhat wacky nature movement and an author who at some point lived below the Hollywood sign.

The picture, by the way, is related, because it too depicts nature.

Aurora's "Nature Boy"

Aurora's

For some reason I missed the trailer to the new Alien: Covenant picture. It looks alright by me, but what I really liked about it was a subdued cover version of Nat King Cole's "Nature Boy".

Turns out it's by Norwegian singer Aurora, and according to the official video on YouTube I've missed that song too, by about a year and more than a million views.

It's a great rendition, and you should listen to it.

Speaking of "great", the whole story of how the actual song came to be is quite interesting as well. It involves a somewhat wacky nature movement and an author who at some point lived below the Hollywood sign.

The picture, by the way, is related, because it too depicts nature.

Aurora's "Nature Boy"
Aurora's "Nature Boy"
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